Railway terminology questions

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Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Sun May 13, 2012 6:53 pm

I'm currently working on an end user's documentation for the PZB. While I can find many english words for railway terminology, some words seem to be very specific in the german system... Please look through the list, suggest words for the missing ones and correct me on wrong uses.

Zwangsbremsung. A braking executed by a supervision system with 0bar in the brake pipe. That's a diverse problem; first off, it seems anything with 0bar in the brake pipe is indifferently called an emergency braking in English. Now we distinguish the terms Schnellbremsung (braking executed by driver with regular brake valve, master controller or auxiliary brake valve), Notbremse (braking executed by passenger or guard with emergency brake device in a carriage or by driver with emergency valve in cab) and Zwangsbremsung (braking executed by a technical device, by an unknown source or because of train division). For the term Zwangsbremsung I use automatic train stop or penalty braking, depending on what fits the context better.

Fahrstrasse, consisting of Fahrweg, Flankenschutz and Durchrutschweg (D-Weg); translated as pre-set route, consisting of ?, flank protection and overlap. The unkown word describes the part of the pre-set route the train is supposed to go on.

Magnet, describes the trackside elements of the security system. I think beacon is the correct word?

Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt (GPA), a device executing an automatic train stop if the speed it is calibrated for is overrun by a passing train. I know from NWM (or was it Birmingham-X-City?) there are such things in the UK, but I couldn't find anything about them, so I now use the term Speed Supervision Device (SSD).

Hauptsignal is a signal telling what is happening here and now. I translate as stop signal.

Vorsignal is a signal telling what the next signal is signalling. I translate as distant signal.

Vorsignaltafel is a plate ('a white, blackbordered plate showing to angles, one over the other, touching each others point' says the signal book, easier said: Black X on white plate) indicating a distant signal. It can sometimes be solitary, this says you have to expect a stop signal in the brake distance from the plate, and till you see it, you expect it is at danger. I translate as distant signal plate.

Hauptsignal mit Vorsignalinformation is a stop signal able of signalling what the next stop signal shows. That's quite normal in the UK, in Ireland, Japan etc., but in Germany the base system all terminology is derived from are the semaphores. I use the term of "stop signal with distant signal functionality.

Ueberwachungssignal (correctly with an U-Umlaut, U with two spots above it, instead of 'Ue', but I'm using a laptop with polish keyboard) is a signal protecting a level crossing. It is not to be confused with a stop signal protecting a level crossing; in that case, the level crossing is supervised by the signalman. The signal we're now talking about signals the state of an automatic level crossing to the driver. In this case, the level crossing is supervised by the driver and the signalman has neither influence nor insight. I decided to go for level crossing supervision signal.

Regelgleis and Gegengleis are the two tracks of a route. The Regelgleis is the one you normally go on, the right one (UK, IR etc.; left), the Gegengleis is the other one. For Regelgleis I'm indecided between right track or normal track or regular track, for Gegengleis it should be either opposite track or wrong track.

Sperrsignal is a signal showing either stop (Hp0, semaphore version: Sh0) or Sh1 (movement ban abolished). They're especially used for shunting, but they are important for trains, too. If the signal shows Sh1, that's a permission to pass for a shunting trip, but it's no permission for a train. However, if it substitutes an entry signal in the Gegengleis, Sh1 is a special permission for the train to proceed. If a station has a group exit signal (the stop signal is valid for several tracks), in every affected track there is such a Sperrsignal. To proceed, you need both a free aspect on the group exit signal and Sh1 on your track.
If you got a free aspect on a stop signal, you normally don't expect a Sperrsignal showing Hp0 (Sh0); if there is one, that's a defect. Nonetheless, you have to stop there. However, if you get a free aspect with a speed restriction of 20km/h, you have to expect to receive stop at such a signal. I went for switch signals generally and switch lightsignals for the electrical light version.

Bahnhof is an operation site consisting of at least one point where trains may begin, end, stop, meet, overhaul or change directions. I call that a Station. You enter with an Einfahrsignal and exit with an Ausfahrsignal, optionally having a Zwischensignal (or more) inbetween. I call those entry signal, exit signal and intermediary signal, respectively. Intermediary signals can divide a station into parts, one part is called a Bahnhofsteil, stationpart.

Ueberleitstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between the tracks of one route. Seems to be a crossover.

Abzweigstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between different routes. I think that's called a junction in English.

The three aforementioned ones form the term Zugmeldestelle, which describes all operation sites that influence the sequence of trains. Not that's something I do not have a slightest idea how to call.

Stumpfgleis is a cul de sac for trains. You know, one end leads somewhere, the other ends, usually with a buffer stop. After some discussion with a collegue who is a trained translator we settled, unsure though, for dead-end track.

Bremswirkgruppe is the element of PZB which executes brakings, in a catalogue by, I think, Knorr I found the term emergency brake device which I'm absolutely not happy with; probably to the differentiation between Schnellbremsung, Zwangsbremsung and Notbremse I mentioned before.

Stoerschalter is a switch with which PZB can be disconnected. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, but the blackbox still works and a supervision on 100km/h is in effect. This is done in several cases, but the namegiving one is the case of a defect, so I went for fault switch in English.

PZB-Hauptschalter is a switch with which PZB can be switched off. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, the blackbox is off, no supervision of any kind is in effect. I translated literally - main switch.

Schnellbremsventil is an outlet used to empty the brake pipe as quick as possible. I translated as quick acting valve which I'm not happy with.

Absperrhahn is a valve operated manually, to switch the connection of something with the pressurized air system. It seems stopcock is the adequate translation.

Bremshundertstel is a unit to measure the brake ability of a train. It roughly is the division of the sum of brake-weights by the train-weight (there are some additional factors in some cases depending on length, type etc.); brake-weight being no weight of a real weight but a defined unit, again. The definition is: A train having 80 brake-percents and travelling at a speed of 120km/h has a braking distance of 1000m with a Schnellbremsung. This equates an average deceleration of -0,56m/s^2. As you already see, I went for brake percentage.

Flankenfahrt - a train crashing into the flank of another one. Seems to translate as a slanting collision.

Ersatzsignal. When a stop signal is defective, it shows stop invariantly. To let a train pass without having to dictate a written order, the signalman can activate this signal. It can be applied at both light signals and semaphores at danger. Also it can be applied to light signals defective in a way they are dark or show an inplausible aspect, e.g. red and green; however it can not be applied to semaphores showing an inplausible aspect. This is due to some complicated electrical dependencies in some variants of signalboxes with semaphores which lead to a risk to high that the signal we're talking about is activated by the same fault that led to the inplausible aspect. If you stand in front of a semaphore showing strange things, you need a written order and must ignore the Ersatzsignal, if existant. To make things more complicated, one of those can be applied to defective semaphores though - it blinks and thus can not happen involuntarily. Enough jabbered, what I wanted: Is subsidiary signal the correct term?

Mastschild - there are basically two of them. They tell me as a driver how to handle the situation if I stand before that light signal if it is at danger or defective. It's related to those "F" and "Nf" plates in France. I translated as signal post plate.

Hauptbahn and Nebenbahn. The first one is a normal railway route, where all regulations apply just normally, where trains are directed with signals etc. Seems to be mainline in English. However there are railways with not much traffic operated under eased conditions, e.g. trains directed via radio ("You may proceed to station XY"), seems to translate to branch line.

Nachschieben with a Schiebelok describes pushing a train with an additional engine on some especially steep track section. I think that's banking a train with a helper engine. In some cases, the additional engine is at the front of the train, Vorspannbetrieb or, seemingly, double-heading. In this case we have the Zuglok which is the engine that came with the train and stays with the train, I literally translated to train engine, the helping one being the Vorspannlok. First I thought of calling that a helper engine as well, but there are different rules and also you can have both at a time, so I don't have a clue. Double-heading engine maybe?

Thank you in advance for your kind help!

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by joeyfjj on Sun May 13, 2012 8:59 pm

Let's see...

Zwangsbremsung. A braking executed by a supervision system with 0bar in the brake pipe. That's a diverse problem; first off, it seems anything with 0bar in the brake pipe is indifferently called an emergency braking in English. Now we distinguish the terms Schnellbremsung (braking executed by driver with regular brake valve, master controller or auxiliary brake valve), Notbremse (braking executed by passenger or guard with emergency brake device in a carriage or by driver with emergency valve in cab) and Zwangsbremsung (braking executed by a technical device, by an unknown source or because of train division). For the term Zwangsbremsung I use automatic train stop or penalty braking, depending on what fits the context better.
"Safety system brake application", but that's a mouthful. I wanted "Emergency brake application", but that's too general.

Fahrstrasse, consisting of Fahrweg, Flankenschutz and Durchrutschweg (D-Weg); translated as pre-set route, consisting of ?, flank protection and overlap. The unkown word describes the part of the pre-set route the train is supposed to go on.
Fahrweg = Path

Magnet, describes the trackside elements of the security system. I think beacon is the correct word?
Magnet = Magnet! If it's really a magnet, why change its name? Smile
Beacon is also OK. It may also be a transponder. A transponder is two-way (transmit + respond), though, while a magnet is usually one-way.

Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt (GPA), a device executing an automatic train stop if the speed it is calibrated for is overrun by a passing train. I know from NWM (or was it Birmingham-X-City?) there are such things in the UK, but I couldn't find anything about them, so I now use the term Speed Supervision Device (SSD).
Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt - the UK system is called TPWS, Train Protection and Warning System. I suppose Speed Supervision Device as proposed would be a good generic term.

Hauptsignal is a signal telling what is happening here and now. I translate as stop signal.
Vorsignal is a signal telling what the next signal is signalling. I translate as distant signal.

I find both to be OK

Vorsignaltafel is a plate ('a white, blackbordered plate showing to angles, one over the other, touching each others point' says the signal book, easier said: Black X on white plate) indicating a distant signal. It can sometimes be solitary, this says you have to expect a stop signal in the brake distance from the plate, and till you see it, you expect it is at danger. I translate as distant signal plate.
Advance signal warning? I feel at the very least, the word "warning" or "caution" should be included.

Hauptsignal mit Vorsignalinformation is a stop signal able of signalling what the next stop signal shows. That's quite normal in the UK, in Ireland, Japan etc., but in Germany the base system all terminology is derived from are the semaphores. I use the term of "stop signal with distant signal functionality.
Stop signal with distant signal indication? Perhaps even Combined stop signal?

Ueberwachungssignal (correctly with an U-Umlaut, U with two spots above it, instead of 'Ue', but I'm using a laptop with polish keyboard) is a signal protecting a level crossing. It is not to be confused with a stop signal protecting a level crossing; in that case, the level crossing is supervised by the signalman. The signal we're now talking about signals the state of an automatic level crossing to the driver. In this case, the level crossing is supervised by the driver and the signalman has neither influence nor insight. I decided to go for level crossing supervision signal.
Sounds good.

Regelgleis and Gegengleis are the two tracks of a route. The Regelgleis is the one you normally go on, the right one (UK, IR etc.; left), the Gegengleis is the other one. For Regelgleis I'm indecided between right track or normal track or regular track, for Gegengleis it should be either opposite track or wrong track.
I'll go for wrong-direction track for Gegengleis, but not sure about the other. Right track should be avoided for confusion with the direction right.

Sperrsignal is a signal showing either stop (Hp0, semaphore version: Sh0) or Sh1 (movement ban abolished). They're especially used for shunting, but they are important for trains, too. If the signal shows Sh1, that's a permission to pass for a shunting trip, but it's no permission for a train. However, if it substitutes an entry signal in the Gegengleis, Sh1 is a special permission for the train to proceed. If a station has a group exit signal (the stop signal is valid for several tracks), in every affected track there is such a Sperrsignal. To proceed, you need both a free aspect on the group exit signal and Sh1 on your track.
If you got a free aspect on a stop signal, you normally don't expect a Sperrsignal showing Hp0 (Sh0); if there is one, that's a defect. Nonetheless, you have to stop there. However, if you get a free aspect with a speed restriction of 20km/h, you have to expect to receive stop at such a signal. I went for switch signals generally and switch lightsignals for the electrical light version.

I'd call it a shunting stop signal, or just a shunting signal.

Bahnhof is an operation site consisting of at least one point where trains may begin, end, stop, meet, overhaul or change directions. I call that a Station. You enter with an Einfahrsignal and exit with an Ausfahrsignal, optionally having a Zwischensignal (or more) inbetween. I call those entry signal, exit signal and intermediary signal, respectively. Intermediary signals can divide a station into parts, one part is called a Bahnhofsteil, stationpart.
Bahnhofsteil could be translated as station segment, section or part.

Ueberleitstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between the tracks of one route. Seems to be a crossover.
Abzweigstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between different routes. I think that's called a junction in English.

Both looks correct.

The three aforementioned ones form the term Zugmeldestelle, which describes all operation sites that influence the sequence of trains. Not that's something I do not have a slightest idea how to call.
Me neither!

Stumpfgleis is a cul de sac for trains. You know, one end leads somewhere, the other ends, usually with a buffer stop. After some discussion with a collegue who is a trained translator we settled, unsure though, for dead-end track.
Perhaps simply end-of-track?

Bremswirkgruppe is the element of PZB which executes brakings, in a catalogue by, I think, Knorr I found the term emergency brake device which I'm absolutely not happy with; probably to the differentiation between Schnellbremsung, Zwangsbremsung and Notbremse I mentioned before.
No idea.

Stoerschalter is a switch with which PZB can be disconnected. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, but the blackbox still works and a supervision on 100km/h is in effect. This is done in several cases, but the namegiving one is the case of a defect, so I went for fault switch in English.
Beacon/transponder Isolation Switch?

PZB-Hauptschalter is a switch with which PZB can be switched off. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, the blackbox is off, no supervision of any kind is in effect. I translated literally - main switch.
Main switch sounds OK.

Schnellbremsventil is an outlet used to empty the brake pipe as quick as possible. I translated as quick acting valve which I'm not happy with.
Perhaps "quick release valve"?

Absperrhahn is a valve operated manually, to switch the connection of something with the pressurized air system. It seems stopcock is the adequate translation.
Not quite sure about this.

Bremshundertstel is a unit to measure the brake ability of a train. It roughly is the division of the sum of brake-weights by the train-weight (there are some additional factors in some cases depending on length, type etc.); brake-weight being no weight of a real weight but a defined unit, again. The definition is: A train having 80 brake-percents and travelling at a speed of 120km/h has a braking distance of 1000m with a Schnellbremsung. This equates an average deceleration of -0,56m/s^2. As you already see, I went for brake percentage.
Not quite sure about this

Flankenfahrt - a train crashing into the flank of another one. Seems to translate as a slanting collision.
"Side collision" might be simpler.

Ersatzsignal. When a stop signal is defective, it shows stop invariantly. To let a train pass without having to dictate a written order, the signalman can activate this signal. It can be applied at both light signals and semaphores at danger. Also it can be applied to light signals defective in a way they are dark or show an inplausible aspect, e.g. red and green; however it can not be applied to semaphores showing an inplausible aspect. This is due to some complicated electrical dependencies in some variants of signalboxes with semaphores which lead to a risk to high that the signal we're talking about is activated by the same fault that led to the inplausible aspect. If you stand in front of a semaphore showing strange things, you need a written order and must ignore the Ersatzsignal, if existant. To make things more complicated, one of those can be applied to defective semaphores though - it blinks and thus can not happen involuntarily. Enough jabbered, what I wanted: Is subsidiary signal the correct term?
Not sure.

Mastschild - there are basically two of them. They tell me as a driver how to handle the situation if I stand before that light signal if it is at danger or defective. It's related to those "F" and "Nf" plates in France. I translated as signal post plate.
Not sure.

Hauptbahn and Nebenbahn. The first one is a normal railway route, where all regulations apply just normally, where trains are directed with signals etc. Seems to be mainline in English. However there are railways with not much traffic operated under eased conditions, e.g. trains directed via radio ("You may proceed to station XY"), seems to translate to branch line.
Not quite sure.

Nachschieben with a Schiebelok describes pushing a train with an additional engine on some especially steep track section. I think that's banking a train with a helper engine. In some cases, the additional engine is at the front of the train, Vorspannbetrieb or, seemingly, double-heading. In this case we have the Zuglok which is the engine that came with the train and stays with the train, I literally translated to train engine, the helping one being the Vorspannlok. First I thought of calling that a helper engine as well, but there are different rules and also you can have both at a time, so I don't have a clue. Double-heading engine maybe?
In Singapore if a train pushing another train, the train pushing is known as the assisting train.
So perhaps Schiebelok = "assisting locomotive"
Zuglok = "main locomotive"
Vorspannlok ="assisting locomotive" again

That's about it.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Sun May 13, 2012 9:12 pm

Thank you! The more people answer, the more diverse the whole thing will become and the better generic terms we'll find. Thank you for making a great start to this!

The original term "Magnet" is, as a matter of a fact, a borderless stupidity. It has nothing to do with magnetism; it's an oscillator circuit, so I'd love not to take this error into other languages Laughing Don't ask, I have not a clue who called that a magnet...


Oh, and "Stumpfgleis" relates to the whole track, beginning with the last point and ending with the end of track; not just the end itself, that would be "Gleisabschluss".


Last edited by Quork on Sun May 13, 2012 9:14 pm; edited 1 time in total

_________________
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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by joeyfjj on Sun May 13, 2012 9:14 pm

I was thinking of AWS magnets, which ARE magnets. Razz

In this case, I'll call it a beacon.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Sun May 13, 2012 9:19 pm

Well, with PZB (former Indusi) it's passive oscillator circuits for 500Hz, 1000Hz and 2000Hz on the trackside. When a signal changes its aspect, a switch is activated, which either opens (and thus disarms) or closes (and thus arms) the circuit. That's it on the trackside. The rest is done in the vehicle; it has an emitter with the three aforementioned frequencies, and the current flowing through the emitter is measured. When it passes an armed beacon, the beacon falls into resonance, draining energy from the electromagnetic field of the vehicle's antenna, thus massively decreasing the current flowing through the emitter; this triggers the further actions on board.

What I described, stayed completely unchanged since 1931. All changes that occured were vehicle-side; up till todays very safe and reliable, computer-controlled PZB 90 v. 2.1.

_________________
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Train driver at DB Fernverkehr in Frankfurt/Main

You can find interesting sites on railways here:
By clicking the link you also support the Schmiden Miniature Railway in reaching more passengers and thus helping secure its future. Thank you! Smile

Quork

Posts: 806
Join date: 2012-05-05
Age: 23
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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by pedned on Sun May 13, 2012 9:28 pm

Quork wrote:I'm currently working on an end user's documentation for the PZB. While I can find many english words for railway terminology, some words seem to be very specific in the german system... Please look through the list, suggest words for the missing ones and correct me on wrong uses.

Zwangsbremsung. A braking executed by a supervision system with 0bar in the brake pipe. That's a diverse problem; first off, it seems anything with 0bar in the brake pipe is indifferently called an emergency braking in English. Now we distinguish the terms Schnellbremsung (braking executed by driver with regular brake valve, master controller or auxiliary brake valve), Notbremse (braking executed by passenger or guard with emergency brake device in a carriage or by driver with emergency valve in cab) and Zwangsbremsung (braking executed by a technical device, by an unknown source or because of train division). For the term Zwangsbremsung I use automatic train stop or penalty braking, depending on what fits the context better.
Emergancy braking application which drops air pressure to 0 bar, caused by safety/Automatic Train Warning/Train Protection equipment. [delete as necessary]

Quork wrote:Fahrstrasse, consisting of Fahrweg, Flankenschutz and Durchrutschweg (D-Weg); translated as pre-set route, consisting of ?, flank protection and overlap. The unkown word describes the part of the pre-set route the train is supposed to go on.

Magnet, describes the trackside elements of the security system. I think beacon is the correct word?
Automatic Train Warning/Train Protection Warning System magnet (used to communicate whether the next signal is 'off' or set to a danger aspect).

Quork wrote:Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt (GPA), a device executing an automatic train stop if the speed it is calibrated for is overrun by a passing train. I know from NWM (or was it Birmingham-X-City?) there are such things in the UK, but I couldn't find anything about them, so I now use the term Speed Supervision Device (SSD).
Train Protection Warning System! - (Known as TPWS)...
Usually 2 magnets at a certain distance apart (depending on line speed), which if passed over too quickly the TPWS device on teh train will dump brake pressure to 0 bar to apply full emergency brakes.

Quork wrote:
Hauptsignal is a signal telling what is happening here and now. I translate as stop signal.
Signal at danger? Or maybe 'starter signal' (usually the one at the end of a station platform).

Quork wrote:
Vorsignal is a signal telling what the next signal is signalling. I translate as distant signal.
Repeater signal (eg. it repeats what the next signal is showing, used mainly when the next signal is hidden by a curve etc)

Quork wrote:
Vorsignaltafel is a plate ('a white, blackbordered plate showing to angles, one over the other, touching each others point' says the signal book, easier said: Black X on white plate) indicating a distant signal. It can sometimes be solitary, this says you have to expect a stop signal in the brake distance from the plate, and till you see it, you expect it is at danger. I translate as distant signal plate.

Hauptsignal mit Vorsignalinformation is a stop signal able of signalling what the next stop signal shows. That's quite normal in the UK, in Ireland, Japan etc., but in Germany the base system all terminology is derived from are the semaphores. I use the term of "stop signal with distant signal functionality.

Ueberwachungssignal (correctly with an U-Umlaut, U with two spots above it, instead of 'Ue', but I'm using a laptop with polish keyboard) is a signal protecting a level crossing. It is not to be confused with a stop signal protecting a level crossing; in that case, the level crossing is supervised by the signalman. The signal we're now talking about signals the state of an automatic level crossing to the driver. In this case, the level crossing is supervised by the driver and the signalman has neither influence nor insight. I decided to go for level crossing supervision signal.

Regelgleis and Gegengleis are the two tracks of a route. The Regelgleis is the one you normally go on, the right one (UK, IR etc.; left), the Gegengleis is the other one. For Regelgleis I'm indecided between right track or normal track or regular track, for Gegengleis it should be either opposite track or wrong track.

Sperrsignal is a signal showing either stop (Hp0, semaphore version: Sh0) or Sh1 (movement ban abolished). They're especially used for shunting, but they are important for trains, too. If the signal shows Sh1, that's a permission to pass for a shunting trip, but it's no permission for a train. However, if it substitutes an entry signal in the Gegengleis, Sh1 is a special permission for the train to proceed. If a station has a group exit signal (the stop signal is valid for several tracks), in every affected track there is such a Sperrsignal. To proceed, you need both a free aspect on the group exit signal and Sh1 on your track.
If you got a free aspect on a stop signal, you normally don't expect a Sperrsignal showing Hp0 (Sh0); if there is one, that's a defect. Nonetheless, you have to stop there. However, if you get a free aspect with a speed restriction of 20km/h, you have to expect to receive stop at such a signal. I went for switch signals generally and switch lightsignals for the electrical light version.
Not exactly sure what you mean, but shunt signal, or ground signal?
Quork wrote:

Bahnhof is an operation site consisting of at least one point where trains may begin, end, stop, meet, overhaul or change directions. I call that a Station. You enter with an Einfahrsignal and exit with an Ausfahrsignal, optionally having a Zwischensignal (or more) inbetween. I call those entry signal, exit signal and intermediary signal, respectively. Intermediary signals can divide a station into parts, one part is called a Bahnhofsteil, stationpart.

Ueberleitstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between the tracks of one route. Seems to be a crossover.
Points (sometimes called "switches")
Quork wrote:

Abzweigstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between different routes. I think that's called a junction in English.
Points, same as above?
Quork wrote:

The three aforementioned ones form the term Zugmeldestelle, which describes all operation sites that influence the sequence of trains. Not that's something I do not have a slightest idea how to call.

Stumpfgleis is a cul de sac for trains. You know, one end leads somewhere, the other ends, usually with a buffer stop. After some discussion with a collegue who is a trained translator we settled, unsure though, for dead-end track.
If it's a station it would be a terminus
Quork wrote:

Bremswirkgruppe is the element of PZB which executes brakings, in a catalogue by, I think, Knorr I found the term emergency brake device which I'm absolutely not happy with; probably to the differentiation between Schnellbremsung, Zwangsbremsung and Notbremse I mentioned before.

Stoerschalter is a switch with which PZB can be disconnected. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, but the blackbox still works and a supervision on 100km/h is in effect. This is done in several cases, but the namegiving one is the case of a defect, so I went for fault switch in English.

PZB-Hauptschalter is a switch with which PZB can be switched off. This means beacons aren't interpreted anymore, the blackbox is off, no supervision of any kind is in effect. I translated literally - main switch.

Schnellbremsventil is an outlet used to empty the brake pipe as quick as possible. I translated as quick acting valve which I'm not happy with.
Emergency Brake? Brake pressure dump valve? I'm not 100% sure, but these sound about right
Quork wrote:

Absperrhahn is a valve operated manually, to switch the connection of something with the pressurized air system. It seems stopcock is the adequate translation.

Bremshundertstel is a unit to measure the brake ability of a train. It roughly is the division of the sum of brake-weights by the train-weight (there are some additional factors in some cases depending on length, type etc.); brake-weight being no weight of a real weight but a defined unit, again. The definition is: A train having 80 brake-percents and travelling at a speed of 120km/h has a braking distance of 1000m with a Schnellbremsung. This equates an average deceleration of -0,56m/s^2. As you already see, I went for brake percentage.

Flankenfahrt - a train crashing into the flank of another one. Seems to translate as a slanting collision.

Ersatzsignal. When a stop signal is defective, it shows stop invariantly. To let a train pass without having to dictate a written order, the signalman can activate this signal. It can be applied at both light signals and semaphores at danger. Also it can be applied to light signals defective in a way they are dark or show an inplausible aspect, e.g. red and green; however it can not be applied to semaphores showing an inplausible aspect. This is due to some complicated electrical dependencies in some variants of signalboxes with semaphores which lead to a risk to high that the signal we're talking about is activated by the same fault that led to the inplausible aspect. If you stand in front of a semaphore showing strange things, you need a written order and must ignore the Ersatzsignal, if existant. To make things more complicated, one of those can be applied to defective semaphores though - it blinks and thus can not happen involuntarily. Enough jabbered, what I wanted: Is subsidiary signal the correct term?

Mastschild - there are basically two of them. They tell me as a driver how to handle the situation if I stand before that light signal if it is at danger or defective. It's related to those "F" and "Nf" plates in France. I translated as signal post plate.

Hauptbahn and Nebenbahn. The first one is a normal railway route, where all regulations apply just normally, where trains are directed with signals etc. Seems to be mainline in English. However there are railways with not much traffic operated under eased conditions, e.g. trains directed via radio ("You may proceed to station XY"), seems to translate to branch line.

Nachschieben with a Schiebelok describes pushing a train with an additional engine on some especially steep track section. I think that's banking a train with a helper engine. In some cases, the additional engine is at the front of the train, Vorspannbetrieb or, seemingly, double-heading. In this case we have the Zuglok which is the engine that came with the train and stays with the train, I literally translated to train engine, the helping one being the Vorspannlok. First I thought of calling that a helper engine as well, but there are different rules and also you can have both at a time, so I don't have a clue. Double-heading engine maybe?
DOuble Heading = 2 locomotives on the front of a train... Pilot Locomotive = Usually attached to the front of a train to assist. Banker = The locomotive pushing from the rear (banking). Wink

Thank you in advance for your kind help![/quote]

Anything I havent answered either im not sure on, or it is already correct.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by joeyfjj on Sun May 13, 2012 9:52 pm

pedned wrote:
Quork wrote:Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt (GPA), a device executing an automatic train stop if the speed it is calibrated for is overrun by a passing train. I know from NWM (or was it Birmingham-X-City?) there are such things in the UK, but I couldn't find anything about them, so I now use the term Speed Supervision Device (SSD).
Train Protection Warning System! - (Known as TPWS)...
Usually 2 magnets at a certain distance apart (depending on line speed), which if passed over too quickly the TPWS device on teh train will dump brake pressure to 0 bar to apply full emergency brakes.

Have to remember that this is not the UK system, so using TPWS is inaccurate, as the system may be different in the technical detail as TPWS.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Sun May 13, 2012 10:17 pm

pedned wrote:
Magnet, describes the trackside elements of the security system. I think beacon is the correct word?
Automatic Train Warning/Train Protection Warning System magnet (used to communicate whether the next signal is 'off' or set to a danger aspect).
Well, that's TPWS-terminology again, which I personally would like to ommit; simply because it creates parallels to a specific system, which confuse far more than they help, I think I'll rather stick with the more generic beacon. Though transponder sounds generic as well. Balise again, which I had taken into consideration, is also rather generic (as used by many systems, e.g. ETCS, ZUB, GNT) but all systems using this word I know are using balises in the middle of the track so, again, parallels only confusing.

Quork wrote:Geschwindigkeitspruefabschnitt (GPA), a device executing an automatic train stop if the speed it is calibrated for is overrun by a passing train. I know from NWM (or was it Birmingham-X-City?) there are such things in the UK, but I couldn't find anything about them, so I now use the term Speed Supervision Device (SSD).
Train Protection Warning System! - (Known as TPWS)...
Usually 2 magnets at a certain distance apart (depending on line speed), which if passed over too quickly the TPWS device on teh train will dump brake pressure to 0 bar to apply full emergency brakes.
That'd be the exact UK system, so again a parallel too confusing, like Joey also noted in this case. Works somewhat different also, apparently. I'll quote myself from the work-in-progress:

A SSD consists of three beacons: Activating beacon, affecting beacon and reset beacon. The activating beacon activates the affecting beacon for a preset time; if the passing vehicle is to quick, its equipment is triggered by the yet active affecting beacon, while the affecting beacon is already deactivated when the vehicle's emitter reaches it if the vehicle travels at or below permitted speed. The reset beacon resets the whole device, readying it for the next train.

Quork wrote:Hauptsignal is a signal telling what is happening here and now. I translate as stop signal.
Signal at danger? Or maybe 'starter signal' (usually the one at the end of a station platform).
I took the term of "stop signal" from this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_of_railway_signals According to this, a stop signal is a signal able to show a danger aspect, as opposed to a distant signal, which can't. The 'starter signal' you mention is another category of terms; it's the terms describing the function of a stop signal. There we have block signals, automatic block signals, protection signals (that's a term in question yet; describes stop signals protecting a specific place like a turnable bridge), entry signals (term in question; describes the signal on the border between route and station, it permits entering the station from the route. In German Einfahrsignal, short Esig), exit signals (term very much in question; is exactly what you called a starter signal, maybe that's a better term? Exit signal is yet the direct translation of Ausfahrsignal. However, I wouldn't go for "usually at end of platform", especially when it comes to greater stations; the Ausfahrsignal, or short Asig, is the last signal in a station. It permits leaving the station and entering the route) and intermediary signals (term also very much in question; that's all stop signals between Esig and Asig, called Zwischensignal, Zsig).

Quork wrote:Vorsignal is a signal telling what the next signal is signalling. I translate as distant signal.
Repeater signal (eg. it repeats what the next signal is showing, used mainly when the next signal is hidden by a curve etc)
Ah I see it's more difficult to think into german signalling than I thought. There is a huge difference between british (or irish) signals and german signals. German signals are very much based on semaphores. Normally, a signal either shows 'you may proceed' or 'you must stop' or 'the next signal lets you proceed' or 'stop before the next signal'. In UK, all signals can be at danger (do not pass) or one yellow (do not pass the next one) [or, not all, two yellow (do not pass the one after the next one] or one green (pass, proceed). In Germany, we very much still work with the division of work; either or. Only when the line is so busy that the block length is as short as the brake distance of the route, and within stations we use signals which can both say "that's up here" and "that's up over there". In older signal system H/V, that's semaphores and the old light signals simply showing the night aspects of semaphores, that's two signals on one post then; only in GDR-system Hl and modern system Ks we have really one signal doing both jobs. And that's why I need the distinction between what I at the moment call 'stop signal' and what I call 'distant signal'. We have repeaters, too; that's Vorsignalwiederholer, and it's identic with the distant signal, only it does not have a distant signal plate and additionally has a small white light above (Ks: Beneath) the aspect.

Sperrsignal is a signal showing either stop (Hp0, semaphore version: Sh0) or Sh1 (movement ban abolished). They're especially used for shunting, but they are important for trains, too. If the signal shows Sh1, that's a permission to pass for a shunting trip, but it's no permission for a train. However, if it substitutes an entry signal in the Gegengleis, Sh1 is a special permission for the train to proceed. If a station has a group exit signal (the stop signal is valid for several tracks), in every affected track there is such a Sperrsignal. To proceed, you need both a free aspect on the group exit signal and Sh1 on your track.
If you got a free aspect on a stop signal, you normally don't expect a Sperrsignal showing Hp0 (Sh0); if there is one, that's a defect. Nonetheless, you have to stop there. However, if you get a free aspect with a speed restriction of 20km/h, you have to expect to receive stop at such a signal. I went for switch signals generally and switch lightsignals for the electrical light version.
Not exactly sure what you mean, but shunt signal, or ground signal?
Well that's a hard one, as shunting signal is often used as a translation; but problem is, shunting signal suggests, in my eyes, that the signal is of no relevance for the trains, which I think also is right in the UK, isn't it? If in the UK the signals also are of relevance to trains, I'll switch to this word, otherwise I'd rather not because of the ambiguity that would arise.

Ueberleitstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between the tracks of one route. Seems to be a crossover.
Points (sometimes called "switches")
The points are the technical device used two let the train go left or right. The term we're looking for is not a technical but an operational one. It contains the usually four points (one to get off the right track, one to get on the left track, one to get off the left track and one to get on the right track), the two or four block signals associated (two if signalling is only for right track travel, four if the route is already equiped for signalled left track travel) and the meaning, that there you can switch between different tracks of the same route.

Abzweigstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between different routes. I think that's called a junction in English.
Points, same as above?
Again, I'm looking for the operational term. This time it's at least one point and three block signals (a one-tracked route branching off another one-tracked route) and many more if we take a more difficult situation like the Abzweig Forsthaus where you can change between several crossing two-tracked lines.

Stumpfgleis is a cul de sac for trains. You know, one end leads somewhere, the other ends, usually with a buffer stop. After some discussion with a collegue who is a trained translator we settled, unsure though, for dead-end track.
If it's a station it would be a terminus[/quote]That was the first thing that came to my mind, too. However, terminus describes a station with only one exit direction, while Stumpfgleis is about the singular track (the terminus Frankfurt Hbf e.g. consists of, I can never remember, 22 or 26 such tracks); and also a station not being a terminus can have such tracks, e.g. tracks 101 and 102 in Karlsruhe central.

Nachschieben with a Schiebelok describes pushing a train with an additional engine on some especially steep track section. I think that's banking a train with a helper engine. In some cases, the additional engine is at the front of the train, Vorspannbetrieb or, seemingly, double-heading. In this case we have the Zuglok which is the engine that came with the train and stays with the train, I literally translated to train engine, the helping one being the Vorspannlok. First I thought of calling that a helper engine as well, but there are different rules and also you can have both at a time, so I don't have a clue. Double-heading engine maybe?
DOuble Heading = 2 locomotives on the front of a train... Pilot Locomotive = Usually attached to the front of a train to assist. Banker = The locomotive pushing from the rear (banking).
Thank you very much for clearing this up!

Thank you for your kind help =)

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by joeyfjj on Mon May 14, 2012 3:14 am

Quork wrote:That was the first thing that came to my mind, too. However, terminus describes a station with only one exit direction, while Stumpfgleis is about the singular track (the terminus Frankfurt Hbf e.g. consists of, I can never remember, 22 or 26 such tracks); and also a station not being a terminus can have such tracks, e.g. tracks 101 and 102 in Karlsruhe central.
Perhaps terminating track?

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by pedned on Mon May 14, 2012 11:09 am

Quork wrote:
Abzweigstelle is an operation site where a train can switch between different routes. I think that's called a junction in English.
Stick to Junction then.

Stumpfgleis is a cul de sac for trains. You know, one end leads somewhere, the other ends, usually with a buffer stop. After some discussion with a collegue who is a trained translator we settled, unsure though, for dead-end track.
If it's a station it would be a terminus
That was the first thing that came to my mind, too. However, terminus describes a station with only one exit direction, while Stumpfgleis is about the singular track (the terminus Frankfurt Hbf e.g. consists of, I can never remember, 22 or 26 such tracks); and also a station not being a terminus can have such tracks, e.g. tracks 101 and 102 in Karlsruhe central.
Terminating Line, or Terminus would still stand. This can be bi-direction, but one end will be at buffer stops, the other end you can come into from, and also leave from. Or maybe you're looking for the term Sidings?

Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by johnsinden on Mon May 14, 2012 5:56 pm

Hi Quork, quickly read through your requests for translation - not easy, as several of the terms are incompatible. However, I do believe "Zwangsbremse" would translate as "Brake Demand", where a driver is approaching a "Danger" or "Caution" signal at excessive speed and the on-board system takes over. I see Jamie's had a go and I'll have a look through myself. One thought has occurred to me - is the German Railway and Signalling system in use in any other country outside Germany? If so, these terms would have had to have been translated into English.

Viele Gruesse,

John

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Mon May 14, 2012 6:52 pm

Hi!

In Germany, there are several historic systems.

First off, the classic semaphores, which have a day aspect (the one or two arms on stop signals and the round plate and on some an arm on distant signals) and a night aspect (lights). These, in their current version, are used in Germany since 1924, and also in Poland, especially but not only in those parts of Poland which were within Germany back then (for those less informed about european history; after World War II the soviet union moved several countries in eastern europe to the west, also shrinking them). The first light signals used in Germany, which now are the most common signal system, simply consist of the night aspects of the semaphores. These two form the H/V system. The polish signals semaphores look the same way and have the same meaning, but names, code designations and all rules around developed independently; so it's true enough to say the H/V system is used in Germany only.

GDR together with the other members of the OSShD, something like east block-UIC, developed a common signal system. While the aspects and their basic meanings are the same in former GDR, Poland, Hungary and other users, the designations etc. differ, again. This is the Hl signal system, and the first signal system in Germany with combined stop/distant signals (the upper light of an aspect announces the next signal's aspect, the lower light signals the current situation, sometimes with an additional yellow or green stripe below; e.g. blinking green over lit yellow over yellow stripe means expect 100km/h, proceed with 60km/h), though still most signals are either a stop signal (then marked with a signal post plate) or a distant signal (then marked with a distant signal plate). So while this signal system as such is international, the rules around again don't provide any source of translation help. Let aside for English, common documentation is, of course, in Russian.

The next signal system is Ks, which was invented after german reunification. It is also capable of combined stop/distant signals, and again often enough signals have only one of those functions. Although being very intuitive and quite similar to other modern signal systems (basically it's green = proceed, yellow = expect stop, red = stop; lit = timetable speed or speed signalled by signal Zs3 showing "1" for 10km/h, "2" for 20km/h etc., blinking = expect speed indicated by Zs3v (again "1" for 10km/h etc.)) it is, again, a solely german affair.

PZB is used in two countries. This might seem great for translation, but it isn't - the other one is Austria, and they speak German down there Wink Israel, countries of former Jugoslavia, Romania and Canada have derived systems, but they're not 1:1 for all I know, and I also couldn't find useful information about them - especially about Canada.
Also, while the train protection system as such is similar or nearly identical, the operational aspects aren't. The canadian route with PZB is still equipped with those american signals which 'aren't red at all if they aren't all red', so most probably also the other operational aspects aren't aligned. And those are the most problematic ones.

In the meantime, I spoke to somebody who is related to mutual validating of regulation translations with one of the non-german-speaking neighbouring countries of Germany; there operational terms are often enough just left as they are. Things that can be translated as they are transferable exactly one to one are translated, and also things that can be literally translated with sense and without creating ambiguity with a term native to the foreign railway system. All other terms stay as they are and are only explained. Thus I stick to Zugmeldestelle, abbreviated Zmst, and it's explained in the guide what a Zugmeldestelle is. Same goes for the three main PZB controls, PZB Wachsam, PZB Frei and PZB Befehl. Some things simply have to be learnt by heart. But I'm quite optimistic the guide will be understandable to everyone.

By the way, the guide will be published in PDF format, both a version for reading on screen and a version for printout. Simply activate duplex printing in your printer (if no such feature exists; print pages 1, 3, 5 etc. first and then 2, 4, 6 etc. on the backside), print and tack it. You'll hold a 32-page thick, easy-to-understand guide in your hands.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Junafani on Mon Jun 11, 2012 10:33 am

In Finland we also have Haupt- and Vorsignals and they look about the same as H/V (actually H/V was inspiration for this system). I would translate Hauptsignal to Main signal ans Vorsignal to distant signal.

Could Zugmeldestelle be rail traffic operating point? That is Finnish official translation for something similar.

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Re: Railway terminology questions

Post by Quork on Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:01 pm

sounds good =)

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