Switzerland

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Switzerland

Post by fcancalon on Fri Sep 19, 2014 6:49 pm

You probably already know the Le Taux - Saint-Julien very nice network available here:
https://sites.google.com/site/bvefrance/projets-francophones/ltsj .
On this link Swiss trains are available as well.

Manuel (muchas gracias!), a brilliant developer proposes here:
http://hstopenbve.blogspot.com/p/sbb-cff-sbb.html#comment-form 
the ICN train, the Swiss tilting-train used for intercity services (Sankt Gallen / Basel - Lausanne / Genève and Zürich - Lugano).

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Re: Switzerland

Post by JLegrand on Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:46 am

Merci Fcancalon pour l'information, and thanks to Manuel for making this swiss train !

I've not tried it yet, but it looks nice.
Since I am a train driver, I noticed that my trains performances are quite wrong and sounds need improving, so I'll certainly - one day - update them and also offer better cab pictures.

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Re: Switzerland

Post by jsiren on Thu Oct 16, 2014 11:28 am

Merci beaucoup, I tried the Le Taux - Saint-Julien line, and it is very nice! In Finland we have a version of the Re460, the Sr2, so it was interesting to try out the simulation.

The main difference between Re460 and Sr2 is that the Finnish locomotive has the control desk on the right side of the cab. There are other minor external differences: some skirting and pantograph shields have been removed to prevent snow buildup and facilitate maintenance.

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Re: Switzerland

Post by JLegrand on Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:47 am

Hello Jsiren,
That's interesting. I've seen a few 460 in Norway too (Oslo - Bergen). 
Is your Sr2 main braking system is electric brake as well? I always wondered as you do seem to have much worst weather conditions and our 460 were made only to use pneumatic brake in case of emergency (dues to the way the wheels were made - it could overheat, and, in worst case, make them fall...!)

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Re: Switzerland

Post by jsiren on Mon Oct 20, 2014 11:43 am

Hello JLegrand,

So I was told. A man from Adtranz gave our club a good presentation of the locomotive and its functions. This was 13 or 14 years ago so I may not remember everything correctly. He said the software in the locomotive decides which brake to use, the electric brake having priority. He also said that the electric brake is very powerful, and can be used down to almost zero speed. At very low speeds braking is enhanced by the independent brake. The train brakes are only used when sufficient braking can't be achieved otherwise. The driver can override the software, but usually shouldn't have to.

I have observed this myself: passenger cars with disk brakes have brake indicators on the sides. When a train arrives pulled by an Sr2, the brake indicators on the cars turn red only when the train is at a standstill or nearly so, and braking is practically silent.

There are two locomotive types in use (Sr1, electric, and Dr16, diesel) equipped with rheostatic brakes, as opposed to the regenerative brakes of the Sr2. Sr1 is a thyristor-controlled DC engine, and its electric brakes aren't usable at low speeds. Dr16 is a diesel-electric locomotive from the mid-eighties with an asynchronous AC drive similar to the one in Sr2/Re460.(1) Its electric brake seems to work to a lower speed than Sr1's. Both have (loud!) cooling fans for the brake resistors. 

Older diesel engines have no dynamic brakes at all and must rely on pneumatic brakes at all times. 

(1) An aside: The drive system of Dr16 is essentially similar to that of Re460, but predates it by about six years. The Re460 drive stems from a Brown Boveri Cie. design, whilst the Dr16 drive was designed and supplied by Strömberg Oy, who incidentally have supplied drive systems to all Finnish electric stock in the 1970s and 80s. Both subsequently merged with ASEA around 1987, so when Re460 was being designed and built, the three former competitors - ASEA, BBC, and Strömberg - were one company.

The mergers continued, and can be followed by looking at the manufacturer's plates on the different Sr2 locomotives. The first ones have SLM - ABB plates, next ones have Adtranz, and the last ones have Bombardier.

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Re: Switzerland

Post by Quork on Mon Oct 20, 2014 12:12 pm

It is very common, at the latest since 3-phase motors are used, to preferably use the electric brake. There is a number of reasons; the two most important are recuperation (dramatically increasing economic efficiency of the railway operation: Less electrical energy is used (up to even more than a third) and brake pads and discs are used less) and control. The reaction time of an electrical brake under difficult conditions (which aren't exactly uncommon på den skandinaviske halvøy are they) is only limited by the controlling electronical system while a pneumatic brake needs quite some more time; also control is much finer so you can use the given circumstances way better. You could never even dream of reaching so-called makro/super skidding with an electropneumatic system; electric braking allows it. Sounds awfully if the wheel shape isn't adjusted for the acoustics; I couldn't find a better video than that one, that's acceleration and not braking but the physics are the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRrLZ_jm4Oc
As I said, sounds awfully (though the DB class 101 sounded way worse with the first generation of wheels; you could hear her over a distance of kilometres...) but helps greatly. The steering gets just a tiny bit past (!) the point where the wheels are just starting to slip/skid; there you have more effective traction than if you eliminate skidding/slipping completely.

The pneumatic brakes wouldn't lead to overheat or wheel failure on a 460 (or virtually any new vehicle). This is a problem of tyred wheels with block brakes. The 460 has, just like virtually any modern vehicle, monobloc wheels and disc brakes (as can be seen in the image at http://www.stayathome.ch/images2/Re460_3_29.jpg ). However it is possible the discs are underdimensioned for regular braking, just like e.g. in the german rapid transit EMU 423; since they aren't used regularily, they are smaller than they would normally be. This leads to them being speed-restricted if electrical braking fails, to protect the brake discs from overheating. Though I must say that would be a major pain up the bottom in a locomotive as these are regularily transferred "cold"...



EDIT

jsiren was faster. Thank you for the insights!
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Re: Switzerland

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